Questions and complaints on electricity

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Questions and complaints on electricity

Supervision and resolving of disputes on the electricity market has been divided between multiple agencies. Thus, without a more thorough analysis, it is often impossible to say who to turn to in order to resolve the problem. There are instances when more than one agency must be involved (the Competition Authority, the Technical Regulatory Authority and the Consumer Protection Board).

  • The Consumer Protection Board resolves issues regarding the terms and conditions of contracts and exercises supervision over the promotional and sales activities of electricity undertakings.
  • The Competition Authority exercises supervision over the operation of the market and the activities of market participants based on the Electricity Market Act.
  • The Technical Regulatory Authority resolves issues regarding electricity safety and electricity meters.
 Ten example questions
  1. You are not satisfied with the customer service of an electricity undertaking or have come across shortcomings on the web page of an undertaking. You should turn to the electricity undertaking as customer services issues must be resolved by the trader. If misleading information has been presented and the undertaking does not take corrective action after your notification, you should turn to the Consumer Protection Board.
  2. You have improperly been issued a contractual penalty or a claim for interest for late payment. You should first carefully read the terms and conditions of the contract and determine the content of the contractual penalty or the interest for late payment. You should also make sure you have paid your bills on time. Only after you have confirmed the contractual penalty or the claim for interest for late payment has been issued improperly and you are unable to resolve the issue with the electricity undertaking, you should turn to the Consumer Protection Board or a court.
  3. You have a claim for the compensation of damages regarding the actions/inactions of an electricity undertaking. First turn to the electricity undertaking and, in case of misunderstandings, to the Consumer Protection Board or a court.
  4. Your electricity meter has not been verified or you have a question about the technical control of the meter. You should turn to the Technical Regulatory Authority.
  5. Your electricity connection has been disconnected by the undertaking.  The legality of disconnections is assessed by the Competition Authority.
  6. An electricity undertaking has changed the terms and conditions of the concluded contract. In case of any question, first turn to the electricity undertaking and ask for an explanation. If you have not been answered or are not satisfied with the new situation, turn to the Consumer Protection Board. You also have the option of defending your rights at court.
  7. You discover that someone has been stealing electricity from you. Immediately turn to the police or the electricity undertaking.
  8. You have been issued an unreasonably pricey bill, yet the existing documents confirm the consumed amount of electricity and its price. You should first turn to the electricity undertaking to clarify the issue. If you are not satisfied with the answer of the electricity undertaking, you have the right to turn to the Consumer Protection Board or a court.
  9. The network quality requirements have not been met in your place of consumption (electricity supply has not been ensured, the voltage fluctuates, etc.).  You should turn to the Competition Authority.
  10. You did not receive a bill.  You should turn to the electricity undertaking. You should also keep in mind that even if the bill is issued with a delay, you do not have the right to refuse payment. However, the undertaking does not have the right to ask for interest for late payment as they themselves delayed issuing the bill.